Just Juliet by Charlotte Reagan [Book Review]

This book cover caught my eye right away. I love the rainbow and I love the obvious depiction of love between two girls.

Despite being an out and proud queer, I didn’t read a lot of LGBTQ fiction until I was an adult, so I’m still catching up on everything I feel like I should have read growing up. That’s why, even though YA isn’t my normal reading fare, I decided to give this book a shot.

cover of LGBTQ coming out book Just Juliet by Charlotte Reagan

Book Description

The coming out story that will completely change the way you look at love. 

Juliet represents the road less traveled. Will Lena take it?

Lena Newman is 17, her best friend’s a cheerleader, her boyfriend’s a football player, and as far as everyone is concerned, her life is sorted. But that’s before she befriends the new girl. Juliet is confident, slightly damaged, drop-dead gorgeous and a lesbian.

Lena realizes that her interest goes beyond just friendship. She sets off on a path of self-discovery where the loyalty of those closest to her will be tested.

My Rating

I wish there had been books like this readily available to me when I was a teenager. I think the road I traveled would not have been near as hard, nor would I have been as confused, or felt so alone.

Lena’s a normal, boring girl living a normal, boring life. She’s got all the trappings of a typical teenage life, and she never wants for anything more… until she meets a new girl named Juliet, and she starts questioning everything.

This is one of those coming-out stories that is more about the individual than the people who love her, and that made it a little different from the kind of things I normally read or hear about. Sure, she has strife with the people she loves when she finally decides to go public, but her real struggle is an internal one. Lena must learn how to accept that she is the one in charge of her own life, not her friends and family, so that she can finally live the life she wants.

It’s a bittersweet story, but it’s full of hope. I love the side characters of Scott, Lakyn, and Georgia. Scott is the GBF all little lesbians and bi girls need. Lakyn is a quiet stream that runs quite deep and dark. As for Georgia, she is not your typical teenage girl; she’s got a little girl who she’s trying to co-parent while finishing high school. And she’s great at it.

I did think this book could have been a little shorter. It got a little repetitive near the middle, closer to the end. But it picked up and finished well. I give it four of five stars and recommend it for anyone looking for an inside perspective of LGBTQ teenage life in America these days.

 

 

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